2017 International Week of the Deaf

 

2017 International Week of the Deaf:

Press Release from the Joint Communications Team (JCT)  

 

ASL:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LSQ:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sept 18, 2017

International Week of the Deaf- Full Inclusion with Sign Language!

September 18 – 24, 2017

 

The Canadian Association of the Deaf-Association des Sourds du Canada (CAD-ASC), the Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (CCSD), Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes (AQILS) and the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) are jointly pleased to endorse activities promoting the International Week of the Deaf, September 18 – 24, 2017 for these events across Canada that will strive to promote the rights of Deaf people and highlight human rights issues on Sign languages and accessibility.

 

The International Week of the Deaf is an initiative of the World Federation of the Deaf, and it has been celebrated since 1958. More than 130 countries around the world will organize events, marches, debates, and campaigns to highlight the concerns of the Deaf community and draws the attention of the general public to the achievements of Deaf people. This year’s theme is “Full Inclusion with Sign Language!”

 

The World Federation of the Deaf has identified key messages to raise awareness about the Deaf Community on different levels around the world including Birth Right; Deaf Identity; Accessibility; Equal Language; Equal Employment Opportunities; Bilingual Education; Equal Participation and Life Long Learning. These key messages reflect human rights for Deaf people as documented throughout the United Nations 2030 Agenda of Sustainable Development Goals, and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which mentions Sign language seven times in five different articles of the Convention.

 

For a full account of the key messages from the World Federation of the Deaf, please visit: https://wfdeaf.org/iwd2017-full-inclusion-with-sign-language/

 

In response to this year’s theme, the Canadian Association of the Deaf-Association des Sourds du Canada (CAD-ASC) has identified Campaign Key Messages that will promote human rights of Deaf people in Canada. CAD-ASC appeals to the Government of Canada to introduce federal accessibility legislation to recognize our two national Sign languages -- American Sign Language (ASL) and langue des signes québécoise (LSQ), which corresponds to the Article 21 of the CRPD that ensures the rights to Sign language recognition. It will demonstrate values of the cultural and linguistic identity of Deaf Canadians as we integrate into both English and French societies. Such recognition ensures the removal of barriers and ensuring equal access, which is an important step towards to become an inclusive and accessible Canada for all Deaf people. These goals are to advocate for:

·         Birth Right: Deaf children to access and acquire ASL and LSQ as their first language;

 

·         Deaf Identity: Deaf people are a cultural and linguistic minority who use ASL and LSQ as their primary languages;

 

·         Accessibility: Deaf people need access to public information and services via ASL and LSQ videos, and qualified Sign language interpreters through public and private sectors; government services, and profit and not-for-profit organizations on education, employment, health care, transportation, immigration, emergency, court, prisons, telecommunications and broadcasting, and others;

 

·         Equal Language: Recognizing ASL and LSQ as an equal language as other spoken/written languages;

 

·         Bilingual Education: is the key to linguistic and cultural identity that provides Deaf students with the opportunities to achieve full citizenship, education and employment;

 

·         Equal Employment Opportunities: removing barriers to allow Deaf people to participate fully in the labour force, including training opportunities, is a requirement to promote greater inclusion for Deaf people to realize their dreams;

 

·         Equal Participation: Deaf people to participate fully in personal, public and political areas along with everyone else, to allow full and equal access to the democratic and electoral system during all levels of government’s election campaign activities and election polls; and

 

·         Lifelong Learning: Deaf people to access education, training and ongoing professional development as a key to gaining, retaining a job, and to be able to make a living.

 

The Canadian Association of the Deaf-Association des Sourds du Canada (CAD-ASC), the Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (CCSD), Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes (AQILS) and the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) collectively encourage Deaf people, their allies and members of the public to attend events and to work in solidarity through Twitter campaign platform, in particular to promote visibility in Canada and around the world with the following hashtags: #AccessibleCanada; #ASLandLSQCanada; #InternationalWeekoftheDeaf; and #FullInclusionwithSignLanguage! to recognize that “Full Inclusion With Sign Language!”

 

 

-30-

 

 

About CAD-ASC

The Canadian Association of the Deaf-Association des Sourds du Canada (CAD-ASC) is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1940 that provides consultation and information on Deaf issues to the public, business, media, educators, governments and others; conduct research and collects data; and community action organization of the Deaf people in Canada. CAD-ASC promote and protect the rights, needs, and concerns of Deaf people who uses American Sign Language (ASL) and langue des signes québécoise (LSQ). The CAD-ASC is affiliated with the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) as an Ordinary Member and CAD-ASC is a United Nations-accredited Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Contact:

Frank Folino, President

ffolino@cad.ca

www.cad.ca

 

About CCSD

The Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (CCSD) is a non-profit charitable organization aiming to preserve, encourage and advance the arts and culture of Canada's Deaf population of all ages. CCSD opened the DEAF CULTURE CENTRE that is located at the Distillery District in Toronto. It features an art gallery, teas and gift shop.

Visitors to the Centre learn about: Deaf leaders and Deaf people’s contributions to society throughout history; Deaf cultural values including the importance of signed languages and Deaf arts; A cross-cultural perspective between Deaf and hearing people.

Today, the CCSD is alive and growing and serves many more with its programming, outreach, cultural activities, and award-winning Deaf heritage resources such as www.deafplanet.com, www.aslphabet.com and Canadian Dictionary of ASL.

CCSD’s position is that with ASL/LSQ acquisition as their starting point, Deaf and hard of hearing babies, toddlers and children across Canada gain incalculable opportunities to be active participants in their society. With full language acquisition, they can be truly ALIVE in every sense of the word. The mandate of the Sign Language Rights for Deaf Children (SLRDC) - Le droit à la langue des signes pour les enfants sourds (DLSES) Coalition is to advocate as a community coalition for all Deaf children to have the human right to ASL/ LSQ at home, school and in their social environment as a foundation for life.

 

Contact:

Vincent Chauvet, President

vchauvet@vcc.ca

www.deafculturecentre.ca

www.thegiftoflanguage.ca

About AQILS

AQILS (Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes) is a non-profit organization of sign language interpreting professionals in Quebec. AQILS was founded in 2015 and is the only association whose members are mostly French-LSQ interpreters. In addition to defending the interests of members, AQILS's mission is to promote the profession so that it may achieve full and complete recognition. For its first year, AQILS adopted its Code of ethics, of which members are honour-bound to adhere to. The website will be accessible to the public in the Fall of 2016. For more information, visit our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/aqilsq

 

 

 

Contact:

Geneviève Bujold, Président

contact@aqils.ca

www.aqils.ca

 

About AVLIC

The Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) is a non-profit, professional association for interpreters whose working languages include a sign language. AVLIC was incorporated in 1979 and has eight Affiliate Chapters across the Canada. AVLIC is the only certifying body for ASL-English interpreters in Canada through the means of our Canadian Evaluation System. Among a variety of services, our members adhere to the AVLIC Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional Conduct to maintain quality and accountability to the field of interpreting.

 

Contact:

Ashley Campbell, President

president@avlic.ca

www.avlic.ca

 


 

Communiqué de presse

POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE

18 septembre 2017

Semaine internationale des Sourds - «Inclusion intégrale avec la langue des signes!»

18 au 24 septembre 2017

 

L'Association des Sourds du Canada / Canadian Association of the Deaf (ASC-CAD), la Société canadienne culturelle des Sourds / Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (CCSD), l’Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes (AQILS) et l’Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) sont heureux d'appuyer les activités promotionnelles de la Semaine internationale des Sourds qui aura lieu du 18 au 24 septembre 2017, qui visera à la promotion des droits des personnes sourdes et à mettre en relief les problèmes relatifs aux droits de la personne en matière de langue des signes et d’accessibilité.

 

La semaine internationale des Sourds, célébrée depuis 1958, est une initiative de la Fédération mondiale des Sourds. Plus de 130 pays à travers le monde organiseront des événements, marches, débats et campagnes pour mettre l’emphase sur les préoccupations de la communauté sourde et attirer l'attention du grand public aux réussites des personnes sourdes. Le thème de cette année est: «Inclusion intégrale avec la langue des signes!»

 

La Fédération mondiale des Sourds a identifié des messages clés de sensibilisation à la communauté sourde à travers le monde et ce, à différents niveaux, y compris: les droits fondamentaux, l’identité sourde, l’accessibilité, l’égalité des langues, l'accessibilité équitable à l’emploi, l’éducation bilingue, la participation à part égale et la formation continue. Ces messages clés illustrent les droits fondamentaux des personnes sourdes tels qu’inscrits dans l'Agenda 2030 des objectifs de développement durable de l’Organisation des Nations Unies (ONU) et dans la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées (CDPH) de l’ONU qui fait mention de la langue des signes à sept reprises dans cinq articles distincts.  

 

Pour un compte rendu complet des messages clés de la Fédération mondiale des Sourds, veuillez visiter :  https://wfdeaf.org/iwd2017-full-inclusion-with-sign-language/

 

En lien avec le thème de cette année, l'Association des Sourds du Canada / Canadian Association of the Deaf (ASC-CAD) a identifié quelques messages ciblés qui visent à promouvoir les droits fondamentaux des personnes sourdes au Canada. L’ASC-CAD demande au gouvernement du Canada d'adopter une législation fédérale sur l'accessibilité pour reconnaître nos deux langues des signes nationales - la langue des signes québécoise (LSQ) et l’American Sign Language (ASL) - ce qui correspond à l'article 21 de la CDPH qui assure le droit à la reconnaissance des langues signées. Cela affirmera les valeurs de l'identité culturelle et linguistique des Sourds canadiens alors que nous nous intégrons dans les sociétés anglophones et francophones. Une telle reconnaissance garantit l'élimination des barrières et l'égalité d'accès, ce qui constitue une étape importante vers la création d'un Canada inclusif et accessible pour toutes les personnes sourdes. Ces objectifs ont pour but de défendre:

●     Le droit acquis à la naissance: L’accès et l’acquisition de la LSQ et l’ASL comme langue première pour les enfants sourds;

 

●     L’identité sourde: Les personnes sourdes forment une minorité culturelle et linguistique qui utilise la LSQ et l’ASL comme langue première;

 

●     L’accessibilité: Les personnes sourdes doivent avoir accès aux informations et services publics via des vidéos en LSQ et ASL, et des interprètes en  langue des signes compétents dans les secteurs public et privé; les services gouvernementaux et les organismes avec but lucratif ou non lucratif, en éducation, emploi, soins de santé, transports, immigration, services d’urgence, tribunaux, prisons, télécommunications et radiodiffusion, et autres ;

 

●     Une langue égale: La LSQ et l’ASL doivent être reconnues comme des langues à part entières au même titre que toutes autres langues orales et écrites ;

 

●     L’éducation bilingue:  Elle est la clé de l’identité culturelle et linguistique qui fournit aux étudiants sourds et malentendants la possibilité d’accéder pleinement à l’éducation, l’emploi et la vie citoyenne ;

 

●     L’égalité des chances d’emploi: Éliminer les barrières pour permettre aux personnes sourdes de participer pleinement à la vie active, y compris les possibilités de formation, est essentiel à une meilleure inclusion menant à la réalisation de leurs rêves ;

 

●     La pleine participation: Afin de permettre un plein accès au système électoral et démocratique et ce, à tous les niveaux des campagnes électorales gouvernementales et des scrutins électoraux, les personnes sourdes, comme tout autres citoyens, doivent s’engager pleinement autant dans les domaines publique et politique que dans leur vie personnelle ;

 

●     La formation continue: Les personnes sourdes doivent accéder à l'éducation, à la formation et au perfectionnement continu afin d’obtenir et de conserver un emploi et dignement gagner leur vie.

 

 

L'Association des Sourds du Canada / Canadian Association of the Deaf (ASC-CAD), la Société canadienne culturelle des Sourds / Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (CCSD), l’Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes (AQILS) et l'Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) encouragent les personnes sourdes, leurs alliés et membres du public à participer aux divers événements et, plus particulièrement, à la campagne de la plateforme Twitter pour promouvoir la visibilité au Canada et partout dans le monde avec les mots-clics suivants: #AccessibleCanada, #ASLandLSQCanada, #InternationalWeekoftheDeaf et  #FullInclusionwithSignLanguage! pour reconnaître l’ «Inclusion intégrale avec la langue des signes!»

 

-30-

 

 

À propos de l’ASC-CAD

 

L'Association des Sourds du Canada / Canadian Association of the Deaf (ASC-CAD) est un organisme à but non lucratif fondé en 1940 qui offre des consultations et informations au sujet des Sourds pour le grand public, les entreprises, les médias, les éducateurs, les gouvernements et autres et qui s’occupe d’amasser des données et mener des recherches sur les enjeux et problèmes reliés à la surdité au Canada. L’ASC-CAD protège et promeut les droits, besoins et préoccupations des personnes Sourdes du Canada qui utilisent la langue des signes québécoise (LSQ) et l’American Sign Language (ASL). L’ASC-CAD est affilié à la Fédération mondiale des sourds (FMS) en tant que membre ordinaire et  est une Organisation non gouvernementale (ONG) accréditée par les Nations Unies à la Convention relative aux droits des personnes handicapées.

 

Contact:

Frank Folino, président

ffolino@cad.ca

www.cad.ca

 

 

À propos de la CCSD/SCCS

 

La Société canadienne culturelle des Sourds / Canadian Cultural Society of the Deaf (SCCS) est un organisme de charité à but non lucratif visant à la promotion, la conservation et l’avancement des arts et de la culture au sein de la population Sourde canadienne de tous âges. La SCCS a ouvert le Centre culturel des Sourds (Deaf Culture Centre) situé dans le Distillery District à Toronto.

On y trouve une galerie d’arts et une boutique de thés et cadeaux.  Les visiteurs y découvrent l’apport de leaders sourds et de la communauté sourde à la société à travers l’histoire, les valeurs culturelles sourdes, y compris l’importance des langues signées et l’art des Sourds et un point de vue interculturel entre Sourds et entendants.

La SCCS est aujourd’hui très active et en pleine croissance, elle dessert une population de plus en plus étendue grâce à sa programmation culturelle, ses activités de sensibilisation, et ses ressources du patrimoine sourd qui ont été récompensées telles que www.deafplanet.com, www.aslphabet.com et le dictionnaire d’ASL canadien.

La SCCS croit que l’acquisition précoce de la LSQ et l’ASL chez les bébés, bambins et enfants sourds canadiens est un avantage inestimable pour leur permettre une pleine participation sociale. Par l’acquisition complète d’une langue, ils peuvent être réellement VIVANTS dans tous les sens. Le mandat de la Coalition du droit à la langue des signes pour les enfants sourds (DLSES) - Sign Language Rights for Deaf Children (SLRDC) est de militer à titre de coalition communautaire pour que tous les enfants sourds aient ce droit fondamental d’accès à la LSQ et ASL à la maison, à l’école et dans leur environnement social, dès leurs premiers pas.

 

Contact:

Vincent Chauvet, président

vchauvet@vcc.ca

www.deafculturecentre.ca

www.thegiftoflanguage.ca

 

À propos de l’AQILS

 

L’Association québécoise des interprètes en langues des signes (AQILS) est un organisme à but non lucratif qui regroupe les professionnels québécois de l’interprétation en langues des signes. L’AQILS a été fondée en 2015 et est la seule association qui regroupe majoritairement des interprètes LSQ-français. Sa mission consiste à promouvoir la profession afin d'en arriver à une reconnaissance pleine et entière, en plus de défendre les intérêts de ses membres. L’AQILS a adopté son propre code de déontologie auquel ses membres ont la responsabilité morale d’adhérer. Son site web a été officiellement lancé à l’automne 2016.

 

Contact:

Geneviève Bujold, présidente

presidence@aqils.ca   

www.aqils.ca

 

 

À propos de l’AVLIC

 

L'Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada (AVLIC) est une association professionnelle à but non lucratif qui regroupe des interprètes dont au moins une langue de travail est une langue signée. L’AVLIC, créée en 1979, est composée de huit chapitres affiliés à travers le Canada. L’AVLIC est le seul organisme de certification d’interprètes ASL-anglais au Canada, grâce à notre système d’évaluation canadien. Parmi une variété de services, nos membres adhèrent au code d'éthique et aux lignes directrices de conduite professionnelle de l’AVLIC afin de maintenir les valeurs de qualité et responsabilité dans le domaine de l’interprétation.

 

Contact:

Ashley Campbell, présidente

president@avlic.ca

www.avlic.ca